Entrance hall. C.M. Collins photographer.

Stucco (Evening Star 19 July 1927): ‘HALL AND DECORATIONS. There is nothing unduly pretentious about the hall, in fact, the same remark applies to the whole place. The visitor is immedjately impressed by the chiselled perfection of everything, and, though he might pardonably go into rhapsodies about what he sees, there is ho vulgar flaunting of ornamentatiop. Beauty there is, and, sometimes, almost enchantment, but everything fits so harmoniously into the general scheme of things that one never has the feeling that it has been merely introduced to bedazzle the eyes of those who mistake a meretricious glitter for legitimate adornment. The spacious stairs and the heavy square piers give an effect of massiveness. The panelling in the hall is carried out in figured beech, the panels being maple. The fibrous plastered coffered ceiling, which is gilded, gives a magnificent golden effect when the hall is flooded with light, and the rainbow-hued lantern at the bottom of the stairs adds a fairy touch or two to the scene. There are no less than eight switches in the hall, and there are between seventy and eighty points of light throughout the house. It is only a moderately-sized home, for all its palace-like fittings, and it is evident that Mr Hudson believes in “letting there be light.” The decorations, which were carried out with the same craftsmanship that has been displayed in every part of the house, were done by Mr A. S. Aburn, and will form the subject of a special article. It will be sufficient to say now that the walls are all in stipple work, being shaded up from dark to light, and here, again, it is impossible to appreciate the subtle artistry of this part of the decoration scheme unless the visitor is carrying out his explorations in the evening.’

Stucco (Evening Star 26 July 1927): ‘Following are particulars that have been supplied of the painting and glazing work at Mr Ambrose Hudson’s house, Tweed street. Mr S. F. Aburn was the contractor … Hall: Dado and woodwork of stairs stained walnut; ceiling finished in gold, shaded and blended. Hall doors leading to drawing and billiard rooms, bevelled plate glass.’

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